defilade

[def-uh-leyd]
noun
1.
protection or shielding from hostile ground observation and flat projecting fire provided by an artificial or natural obstacle, as a hill.
verb (used with object), defiladed, defilading.
2.
to shield from enemy fire by using natural or artificial obstacles.

Origin:
1820–30; < French défil(er), orig. to unthread (equivalent to dé- dis-1 + (en)filer to thread ≪ Latin fīlum thread) + French -ade -ade1

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World English Dictionary
defilade (ˌdɛfɪˈleɪd)
 
n
1.  protection provided by obstacles against enemy crossfire from the rear, or observation
2.  the disposition of defensive fortifications to produce this protection
 
vb
3.  to provide protection for by defilade
 
[C19: see de-, enfilade]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

defilade
1828, from defile (n.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The island, devoid of natural defilade positions and narrow enough to limit maneuver room, favored the defenders.
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