definitive

[dih-fin-i-tiv]
adjective
1.
most reliable or complete, as of a text, author, criticism, study, or the like: the definitive biography of Andrew Jackson.
2.
serving to define, fix, or specify definitely: to clarify with a definitive statement.
3.
having its fixed and final form; providing a solution or final answer; satisfying all criteria: the definitive treatment for an infection; a definitive answer to a dilemma.
4.
Biology. fully developed or formed; complete.
noun
5.
a defining or limiting word, as an article, a demonstrative, or the like.
6.
Philately. a stamp that is a regular issue and is usually on sale for an extended period of time. Compare commemorative ( def 2 ).

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Old French < Latin dēfīnītīvus, equivalent to dēfīnīt(us) (see definite) + -īvus -ive

definitively, adverb
definitiveness, noun
nondefinitive, adjective
nondefinitively, adverb
nondefinitiveness, noun
undefinitive, adjective
undefinitively, adverb
undefinitiveness, noun

definite, definitive.


3. complete, absolute, ultimate, supreme.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
definitive (dɪˈfɪnɪtɪv)
 
adj
1.  serving to decide or settle finally; conclusive
2.  most reliable, complete, or authoritative: the definitive reading of a text
3.  serving to define or outline
4.  zoology fully developed; complete: the definitive form of a parasite
5.  a.  (of postage stamps) permanently on sale
 b.  (as noun) a definitive postage stamp
 
n
6.  grammar a word indicating specificity of reference, such as the definite article or a demonstrative adjective or pronoun
 
de'finitively
 
adv
 
de'finitiveness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

definitive
late 14c., from O.Fr. definitif (12c.), from L. definitivus, from pp. stem of definire (see define). Related: Definitively (1520s).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The studies varied in terms of the rigor and definitiveness of their methodologies.
These articles varied in terms of the rigor and definitiveness of their methodologies.
People may have an inherent tendency to view published information with undue authority or definitiveness.
The witness's lack of definitiveness is for the jury to evaluate.
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