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degrading

[dih-grey-ding] /dɪˈgreɪ dɪŋ/
adjective
1.
that degrades; debasing; humiliating:
degrading submission.
Origin
1675-1685
1675-85; degrade + -ing2
Related forms
degradingly, adverb
degradingness, noun
nondegrading, adjective
undegrading, adjective

degrade

[dih-greyd or for 3, dee-greyd] /dɪˈgreɪd or for 3, diˈgreɪd/
verb (used with object), degraded, degrading.
1.
to lower in dignity or estimation; bring into contempt:
He felt they were degrading him by making him report to the supervisor.
2.
to lower in character or quality; debase.
3.
to reduce (someone) to a lower rank, degree, etc.; deprive of office, rank, status, or title, especially as a punishment:
degraded from director to assistant director.
4.
to reduce in amount, strength, intensity, etc.
5.
Physical Geography. to wear down by erosion, as hills.
Compare aggrade.
6.
Chemistry. to break down (a compound, especially an organic hydrocarbon).
verb (used without object), degraded, degrading.
7.
to become degraded; weaken or worsen; deteriorate.
8.
Chemistry. (especially of an organic hydrocarbon compound) to break down or decompose.
Origin
1275-1325; Middle English degraden < Late Latin dēgradāre, equivalent to Latin dē- de- + grad(us) grade + -āre infinitive suffix
Related forms
degrader, noun
Synonyms
1. disgrace, dishonor, discredit. See humble. 2. abase, vitiate. 3. demote, depose, downgrade, lower, cashier, break.
Antonyms
1, 2. exalt. 3. promote.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for degrading
  • Some say such events are degrading and anachronistic.
  • If he were belittling students through use of degrading epithets, that would be a different story.
  • First, hunters tend to prize taking out the largest and healthiest animals, thus degrading the genetic stock of their quarry.
  • Tourism can contribute to preserving your locale-or to degrading it.
  • The thin film allows batteries to charge and recharge quickly, but at the cost of significant degrading over time.
  • Cover the cloth with mulch to keep it from degrading in the sun.
  • Apple says it does this to prevent random programs from sucking down your battery and degrading your phone's performance.
  • It is blatantly unprofessional journalism to use such a degrading tone.
  • In many places, bottom sediment was blanketed with the slime, which does not appear to be degrading.
  • Policymakers need to figure out how to supply water without degrading the natural ecosystems that provide it.
British Dictionary definitions for degrading

degrading

/dɪˈɡreɪdɪŋ/
adjective
1.
causing humiliation; debasing
Derived Forms
degradingly, adverb
degradingness, noun

degrade

/dɪˈɡreɪd/
verb
1.
(transitive) to reduce in worth, character, etc; disgrace; dishonour
2.
(transitive) (diːˈɡreɪd). to reduce in rank, status, or degree; remove from office; demote
3.
(transitive) to reduce in strength, quality, intensity, etc
4.
to reduce or be reduced by erosion or down-cutting, as a land surface or bed of a river Compare aggrade
5.
(chem) to decompose or be decomposed into atoms or smaller molecules
Derived Forms
degrader, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Late Latin dēgradāre, from Latin de- + gradus rank, degree
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for degrading

degrade

v.

late 14c., from Old French degrader (12c.) "degrade, deprive (of office, rank, etc.)," from des- "down" (see dis-) + Latin gradus "step" (see grade (n.)). Related: Degraded; degrading.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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