delicious

[dih-lish-uhs]
adjective
1.
highly pleasing to the senses, especially to taste or smell: a delicious dinner; a delicious aroma.
2.
very pleasing; delightful: a delicious sense of humor.
noun
3.
(initial capital letter) a red or yellow variety of apple, cultivated in the U.S.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English < Old French < Late Latin dēliciōsus, equivalent to Latin dēliciae delight + -ōsus -ous

deliciously, adverb
deliciousness, noun
hyperdelicious, adjective
hyperdeliciously, adverb
hyperdeliciousness, noun
overdelicious, adjective
overdeliciously, adverb
overdeliciousness, noun
undelicious, adjective
undeliciously, adverb


1. palatable, savory, delectable, dainty, delicate. Delicious, luscious refer to that which is especially agreeable to the senses. That which is delicious is highly agreeable to the taste or sometimes to the smell: a delicious meal. Luscious implies such a luxuriant fullness or ripeness as to make an object rich: a luscious banana; a luscious beauty; luscious music.


1. unpleasant.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
delicious (dɪˈlɪʃəs)
 
adj
1.  very appealing to the senses, esp to the taste or smell
2.  extremely enjoyable or entertaining: a delicious joke
 
[C13: from Old French, from Late Latin dēliciōsus, from Latin dēliciae delights, charms, from dēlicere to entice; see delight]
 
de'liciously
 
adv
 
de'liciousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

delicious
c.1300, from O.Fr. delicieus, from L.L. deliciosus "delicious, delicate," from L. delicia (pl. deliciæ) "a delight," from delicere "to allure, entice," from de- "away" + lacere "lure, deceive." As a name of a type of apple, attested from 1903, first grown by Jesse Hiatt of Iowa, U.S.A. Colloquial
shortening delish is attested from 1920.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Some nineteenth-century vintages still taste delicious, provided they have been
  properly stored.
Some subjects viewed low-imagery text ads, which described the delicious taste
  of this new snack food.
They are known for their delicious, home-made moles with the perfect
  combination of sweet and spicy.
Plant these six basil varieties together for delicious harvest all summer.
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