motivate

[moh-tuh-veyt]
verb (used with object), motivated, motivating.
to provide with a motive or motives; incite; impel.

Origin:
1860–65; motive + -ate1

motivator, noun
demotivate, verb (used with object), demotivated, demotivating.
demotivator, noun
nonmotivated, adjective
remotivate, verb (used with object), remotivated, remotivating.
unmotivated, adjective
unmotivating, adjective
well-motivated, adjective


induce, move, provoke, prompt, cause.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
motivate (ˈməʊtɪˌveɪt)
 
vb
(tr) to give incentive to
 
'motivator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Main Entry:  demotivate
Part of Speech:  v
Definition:  to make someone lose motivation, esp. to carry out a task or job
Etymology:  de + motivate
Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

motivate
1885, "to stimulate toward action," from motive (q.v.), perhaps modeled on Fr. motiver or Ger. motivieren. Related: Motivated; motivating.

demotivate
1976, from de- + motivate.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Huge rewards for the few demotivate the rest of the workforce.
Low salaries demotivate teachers and make backhanders look more attractive.
It explains why extrinsic, behaviorist reward systems eventually demotivate students.
Name some of the ways that a supervisor can demotivate staff.
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