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deprive

[dih-prahyv] /dɪˈpraɪv/
verb (used with object), deprived, depriving.
1.
to remove or withhold something from the enjoyment or possession of (a person or persons):
to deprive a man of life; to deprive a baby of candy.
2.
to remove from ecclesiastical office.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English depriven < Anglo-French, Old French depriver < Medieval Latin dēprīvāre, equivalent to Latin dē- de- + prīvāre to deprive (prīv(us) private + -āre infinitive suffix)
Related forms
deprivable, adjective
deprival, noun
deprivative
[dih-priv-uh-tiv] /dɪˈprɪv ə tɪv/ (Show IPA),
adjective
depriver, noun
nondeprivable, adjective
predeprive, verb (used with object), predeprived, predepriving.
self-depriving, adjective
Synonyms
1. See strip1 .
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for depriving
  • Viruses use iron as part of their reproductive cycle, so depriving them of it blocks their dissemination.
  • After school, parents shuttle their kids from activity to activity, depriving them of unstructured time alone or with friends.
  • Although you are not stealing, you are depriving someone else from earning a living.
  • depriving students of those basics in a rush to make them critical doesn't make sense.
  • It slowly grows downward, over the host tree, depriving it from light and moisture.
  • If that is right, then they would be depriving some of the world's poorest people of desperately needed wealth.
  • It may also push back the launch of the new product for which a patent is sought, depriving customers of the benefits.
  • There is justification for depriving prisoners the right to vote.
  • Abstainers were told that their virtuousness was hurting commerce and depriving the country of revenue.
  • The economy has turned out weaker than the president expected, depriving him of hoped-for tax revenue.
British Dictionary definitions for depriving

deprive

/dɪˈpraɪv/
verb (transitive)
1.
(foll by of) to prevent from possessing or enjoying; dispossess (of)
2.
(archaic) to remove from rank or office; depose; demote
Derived Forms
deprivable, adjective
deprival, noun
depriver, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French depriver, from Medieval Latin dēprīvāre, from Latin de- + prīvāre to deprive of, rob; see private
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for depriving

deprive

v.

mid-14c., from Old French depriver, from Medieval Latin deprivare, from Latin de- "entirely" (see de-) + privare "release from" (see private). Replaced Old English bedælan. Related: Deprived; depriving.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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depriving in Medicine

deprive de·prive (dĭ-prīv')
v. de·prived, de·priv·ing, de·prives

  1. To take something from someone or something.

  2. To keep from possessing or enjoying something.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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