derelict

[der-uh-likt]
adjective
1.
left or deserted, as by the owner or guardian; abandoned: a derelict ship.
2.
neglectful of duty; delinquent; negligent.
noun
3.
a person abandoned by society, especially a person without a permanent home and means of support; vagrant; bum.
4.
Nautical. a vessel abandoned in open water by its crew without any hope or intention of returning.
5.
personal property abandoned or thrown away by the owner.
6.
one guilty of neglect of duty.
7.
Law. land left dry by a change of the water line.

Origin:
1640–50; < Latin dērelictus forsaken (past participle of dērelinquere), equivalent to dē- de- + relictus past participle of relinquere to leave, abandon; see relinquish

derelictly, adverb
derelictness, noun
nonderelict, adjective, noun


2. remiss, careless, heedless.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
derelict (ˈdɛrɪlɪkt)
 
adj
1.  deserted or abandoned, as by an owner, occupant, etc
2.  falling into ruins; neglected; dilapidated
3.  neglectful of duty or obligation; remiss
 
n
4.  a person abandoned or neglected by society; a social outcast or vagrant
5.  property deserted or abandoned by an owner, occupant, etc
6.  a vessel abandoned at sea
7.  a person who is neglectful of duty or obligation
 
[C17: from Latin dērelictus forsaken, from dērelinquere to abandon, from de- + relinquere to leave]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

derelict
1640s, from L. derelictus, pp. of dereliquere "abandon," from de- "entirely" + relinquere "leave behind" (see relinquish). Originally especially of vessels abandoned at sea or stranded on shore.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Moreover, the upheaval accompanying redevelopment had drawn into it an extra
  share of derelicts and thieves.
Doorways in which derelicts used to sleep now give way to trendy nightspots.
Piper also mentioned derelicts hanging out in the area.
She is not saying that these people are the derelicts of the town but,
  unfortunately, they have a problem.
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