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deride

[dih-rahyd] /dɪˈraɪd/
verb (used with object), derided, deriding.
1.
to laugh at in scorn or contempt; scoff or jeer at; mock.
Origin
1520-1530
1520-30; < Latin dērīdēre to mock, equivalent to dē- de- + rīdēre to laugh
Related forms
derider, noun
deridingly, adverb
overderide, verb (used with object), overderided, overderiding.
underided, adjective
Synonyms
taunt, flout, gibe, banter, rally. See ridicule.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for deriding
  • Jobs is well-known for his statements deriding the notion of a smaller tablet.
  • And calling names and deriding people for wanting to avoid taking an action that may cause harm is wrong.
  • Unfortunately, critics have taken to deriding green jobs as little more than a marketing tool contrived by environmentalists.
  • There was no bitter public debate, no deriding of each other by the parties and no disruption of the workforce.
British Dictionary definitions for deriding

deride

/dɪˈraɪd/
verb
1.
(transitive) to speak of or treat with contempt, mockery, or ridicule; scoff or jeer at
Derived Forms
derider, noun
deridingly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Latin dērīdēre to laugh to scorn, from de- + rīdēre to laugh, smile
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for deriding

deride

v.

1520s, from Middle French derider, from Latin deridere "to ridicule, laugh to scorn" (see derision). Related: Derided; deriding.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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