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derive

[dih-rahyv] /dɪˈraɪv/
verb (used with object), derived, deriving.
1.
to receive or obtain from a source or origin (usually followed by from).
2.
to trace from a source or origin.
3.
to reach or obtain by reasoning; deduce; infer.
4.
Chemistry. to produce or obtain (a substance) from another.
verb (used without object), derived, deriving.
5.
to come from a source or origin; originate (often followed by from).
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English diriven, deriven to flow, draw from, spring < Anglo-French, Old French deriver < Latin dērīvāre to lead off, equivalent to dē- de- + rīv(us) a stream + -āre infinitive suffix
Related forms
derivable, adjective
deriver, noun
nonderivable, adjective
prederive, verb (used with object), prederived, prederiving.
self-derived, adjective
underivable, adjective
well-derived, adjective
Synonyms
1. gain, attain, glean, gather, reap, net.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for derives
  • In other words, our intellectual property protection derives from our being the only real-time source of it.
  • Enormous satisfaction derives from being able to help someone in distress.
  • There's also a story-telling tool, a method that derives directly from historical understanding.
  • Part of this interpretation derives from the uncertainty of when an event happens.
  • Some of the support derives from real virtues that small companies offer-diversity of choice, connection to local communities.
  • One of the crucial modes of cinematic modernity is the personal film, the story that derives from the filmmaker's life.
  • The movie's power derives from what can only be called under-staging.
  • Much of the spectacle derives from the interplay of the steel lattice and the concrete shell underneath.
  • The historic brand derives its success from its image of tradition and authenticity.
  • As far as scientists can tell, this rule derives from the fact that the more body there is, the more neurons needed to control it.
British Dictionary definitions for derives

derive

/dɪˈraɪv/
verb
1.
(usually foll by from) to draw or be drawn (from) in source or origin; trace or be traced
2.
(transitive) to obtain by reasoning; deduce; infer
3.
(transitive) to trace the source or development of
4.
(usually foll by from) to produce or be produced (from) by a chemical reaction
5.
(maths) to obtain (a function) by differentiation
Derived Forms
derivable, adjective
deriver, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French deriver to spring from, from Latin dērīvāre to draw off, from de- + rīvus a stream
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for derives

derive

v.

late 14c., from Old French deriver "to flow, pour out; derive, originate," from Latin derivare "to lead or draw off (a stream of water) from its source" (in Late Latin also "to derive"), from phrase de rivo (de "from" + rivus "stream;" see rivulet). Etymological sense is 1550s. Related: Derived; deriving.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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derives in Medicine

derive de·rive (dĭ-rīv')
v. de·rived, de·riv·ing, de·rives

  1. To obtain or receive from a source.

  2. To produce or obtain a chemical compound from another substance by chemical reaction.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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