desecrate

[des-i-kreyt]
verb (used with object), desecrated, desecrating.
1.
to divest of sacred or hallowed character or office.
2.
to divert from a sacred to a profane use or purpose.
3.
to treat with sacrilege; profane.

Origin:
1665–75; de- + -secrate, modeled on consecrate

desecrater, desecrator, noun
desecration, noun
nondesecration, noun
undesecrated, adjective


3. defile, violate, dishonor, pollute, outrage.
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World English Dictionary
desecrate (ˈdɛsɪˌkreɪt)
 
vb
1.  to violate or outrage the sacred character of (an object or place) by destructive, blasphemous, or sacrilegious action
2.  to remove the consecration from (a person, object, building, etc); deconsecrate
 
[C17: from de- + consecrate]
 
'desecrator
 
n
 
'desecrater
 
n
 
dese'cration
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

desecrate
1674, formed from de- "do the opposite of" + (con)secrate. O.Fr. had dessacrer "to profane," and there is a similar formation in It.; but L. desecrare meant "to make holy," with de- in this case having a completive sense.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He wonders whether the people will honor or desecrate his corpse after he dies.
Area tribes have said the project would desecrate submerged ancestral burial
  sites.
Hawking trinkets is not the only way to desecrate a sacred site.
To assert so is to desecrate their memories.
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