deuteromycetes

deuteromycete

[doo-tuh-roh-mahy-seet, -mahy-seet, dyoo-]
noun
any fungus of the class fungi Imperfecti.

Origin:
< Neo-Latin Deuteromycetes; see deutero-, -mycete

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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

Deuteromycetes Deu·ter·o·my·ce·tes (dōō'tə-rō-mī-sē'tēz', dyōō'-)
n.
See Fungi Imperfecti.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
deuteromycete   (d'tə-rō-mī'sēt')  Pronunciation Key 
Any of various fungi that reproduce only asexually, by means of conidia. The penicillin mold, the fungus that causes athlete's foot, and the fungus that causes root rot and damping off in plants are deuteromycetes. The deuteromycetes do not form a natural phylogenetic grouping. Instead, the classification simply includes the fungal species that have lost the sexual stage in their life cycle. Most deuteromycete species are in fact descended from ascomycetes and can be reclassified as such if their sexual stage is discovered. Also called imperfect fungus. Compare perfect fungus.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

deuteromycetes

fungi (kingdom Fungi) in which a true sexual state is uncommon or unknown. Many of these fungi reproduce asexually by spores (conidia or oidia) or by budding. Conidial stages are similar to those in the phylum Ascomycota, but those of some species show affinities to lower (primitive) fungi and the phylum Basidiomycota. Because of this ambiguity, the term deuteromycetes is used only to describe some species of fungi and has very little importance in the classification of fungi.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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