follow Dictionary.com

Yours, Etc.: Origins and Uses of 8 Sign-Offs

devour

[dih-vou-uh r, -vou-er] /dɪˈvaʊ ər, -ˈvaʊ ər/
verb (used with object)
1.
to swallow or eat up hungrily, voraciously, or ravenously.
2.
to consume destructively, recklessly, or wantonly:
Fire devoured the old museum.
3.
to engulf or swallow up.
4.
to take in greedily with the senses or intellect:
to devour the works of Freud.
5.
to absorb or engross wholly:
a mind devoured by fears.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English devouren < Anglo-French, Old French devourer < Latin dēvorāre to swallow down, equivalent to dē- de- + vorāre to eat up
Related forms
devourer, noun
devouringly, adverb
devouringness, noun
interdevour, verb (used with object)
predevour, verb (used with object)
redevour, verb (used with object)
self-devouring, adjective
undevoured, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for devouring
  • And you know things are dire when people optimistically greet the discovery that meat-eating ants are devouring the toads.
  • If you have either tent caterpillars or fall webworms, you should be seeing lots of caterpillars devouring your trees leaves.
  • Some of us should have already realised that this culture of consumerism, of devouring products, will never have an end.
  • Every few minutes a fir ignites, flames devouring it in a rush of light, the roar of rockets.
  • By devouring rotting matter, the scavenging insects cleared the nest of potentially dangerous microbes.
  • We have unmistakable proof that throughout all past time, there has been a ceaseless devouring of the weak by the strong.
  • So he ate even as a mountain-bred lion, and ceased not, devouring entrails and flesh and bones with their marrow.
  • Now they accomplished their identification with him by devouring him and each acquired a part of his strength.
  • He consumed three club sandwiches, devouring each as though it were no larger than a chocolate-drop.
  • The stellar cannibal flared in brightness and threw off a shell of gas after devouring a large chunk of a helpless companion.
British Dictionary definitions for devouring

devour

/dɪˈvaʊə/
verb (transitive)
1.
to swallow or eat up greedily or voraciously
2.
to waste or destroy; consume: the flames devoured the curtains
3.
to consume greedily or avidly with the senses or mind: he devoured the manuscripts
4.
to engulf or absorb: the flood devoured the land
Derived Forms
devourer, noun
devouring, adjective
devouringly, adverb
Word Origin
C14: from Old French devourer, from Latin dēvorāre to gulp down, from de- + vorāre to consume greedily; see voracious
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for devouring

devour

v.

early 14c., from Old French devorer (12c.) "devour, swallow up, engulf," from Latin devorare "swallow down, accept eagerly," from de- "down" (see de-) + vorare "to swallow" (see voracity). Related: Devoured; devouring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for devour

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for devouring

14
18
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with devouring

Nearby words for devouring