dignities

dignity

[dig-ni-tee]
noun, plural dignities.
1.
bearing, conduct, or speech indicative of self-respect or appreciation of the formality or gravity of an occasion or situation.
2.
nobility or elevation of character; worthiness: dignity of sentiments.
3.
elevated rank, office, station, etc.
4.
relative standing; rank.
5.
a sign or token of respect: an impertinent question unworthy of the dignity of an answer.
6.
Archaic.
a.
person of high rank or title.
b.
such persons collectively.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English dignite < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin dignitās worthiness, equivalent to dign(us) worthy + -itās -ity

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World English Dictionary
dignity (ˈdɪɡnɪtɪ)
 
n , pl -ties
1.  a formal, stately, or grave bearing: he entered with dignity
2.  the state or quality of being worthy of honour: the dignity of manual labour
3.  relative importance; rank: he is next in dignity to the mayor
4.  sense of self-importance (often in the phrases stand (or be) on one's dignity, beneath one's dignity)
5.  high rank, esp in government or the church
6.  a person of high rank or such persons collectively
 
[C13: from Old French dignite, from Latin dignitās merit, from dignus worthy]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dignity
early 13c., from O.Fr. dignete, from L. dignitatem (nom. dignitas) "worthiness," from dignus "worth (n.), worthy, proper, fitting" from PIE *dek-no-, from base *dek- "to take, accept" (see decent).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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