digression

[dih-gresh-uhn, dahy-]
noun
1.
the act of digressing.
2.
a passage or section that deviates from the central theme in speech or writing.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin dīgressiōn- (stem of dīgressiō) a going away, aside, equivalent to dīgress(us) (see digress) + -iōn- -ion

digressional, digressionary, adjective


1, 2. deviation, divergence.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To digressions
Collins
World English Dictionary
digression (daɪˈɡrɛʃən)
 
n
an act or instance of digressing from a main subject in speech or writing
 
digressional
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

digression
late 14c., from L. digressionem, from digredi "to deviate," from dis- "apart, aside" + gradi "to step, go."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Conversation becomes spirited, stories are being told, digressions occur.
It presents a series of digressions and observations-some a few lines, others a
  few pages-on the topic.
Sometimes they're digressions, but they're part of the whole experience.
Neither his grip upon his subject nor his technical mastery yet avail to make
  these felt otherwise than as digressions.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature