dilatory

[dil-uh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee]
adjective
1.
tending to delay or procrastinate; slow; tardy.
2.
intended to cause delay, gain time, or defer decision: a dilatory strategy.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin dīlātōrius, equivalent to dīlā-, suppletive stem of differre to postpone (see differ) + -tōrius -tory1

dilatorily, adverb
dilatoriness, noun
undilatorily, adverb
undilatory, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
dilatory (ˈdɪlətərɪ, -trɪ)
 
adj
1.  tending or inclined to delay or waste time
2.  intended or designed to waste time or defer action
 
[C15: from Late Latin dīlātōrius inclined to delay, from differre to postpone; see differ]
 
'dilatorily
 
adv
 
'dilatoriness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dilatory
1530s, from L. dilatorius, from dilator "procrastinator," from dilatus, serving as pp. of differe "delay" (see defer).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Diligence was his middle name, but few have made dilatoriness sound so
  attractive.
The affair was dallied with, and inefficiency and dilatoriness prevailed
  everywhere.
Furthermore, defendants do not have a history of dilatoriness and no prejudice
  has incurred to plaintiff.
Second, the record evidences a history of dilatoriness.
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