dilemma-tical

dilemma

[dih-lem-uh]
noun
1.
a situation requiring a choice between equally undesirable alternatives.
2.
any difficult or perplexing situation or problem.
3.
Logic. a form of syllogism in which the major premise is formed of two or more hypothetical propositions and the minor premise is a disjunctive proposition, as “If A, then B; if C then D. Either A or C. Therefore, either B or D.”

Origin:
1515–25; < Late Latin < Greek dílēmma, equivalent to di- di-1 + lêmma an assumption, premise, derivative of lambánein to take

dilemmatic [dil-uh-mat-ik] , dilemmatical, dilemmic, adjective
dilemmatically, adverb


1. See predicament. 2. question, difficulty.
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World English Dictionary
dilemma (dɪˈlɛmə, daɪ-)
 
n
1.  a situation necessitating a choice between two equal, esp equally undesirable, alternatives
2.  a problem that seems incapable of a solution
3.  logic a form of argument one of whose premises is the conjunction of two conditional statements and the other of which affirms the disjunction of their antecedents, and whose conclusion is the disjunction of their consequents. Its form is if p then q and if r then s; either p or r so either q or s
4.  on the horns of a dilemma
 a.  faced with the choice between two equally unpalatable alternatives
 b.  in an awkward situation
 
[C16: via Latin from Greek, from di-1 + lēmma assumption, proposition, from lambanein to take, grasp]
 
usage  The use of dilemma to refer to a problem that seems incapable of a solution is considered by some people to be incorrect
 
dilemmatic
 
adj
 
dil'emmic
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

dilemma
1520s, from L.L. dilemma, from Gk. dilemma "double proposition," a technical term in rhetoric, from di- "two" + lemma "premise, anything received or taken," from root of lambanein "to take" (see analemma). It should be used only of situations where someone is forced to
choose between two alternatives, both unfavorable to him. But even logicians disagree on whether certain situations are dilemmas or mere syllogisms.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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