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diminish

[dih-min-ish] /dɪˈmɪn ɪʃ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to make or cause to seem smaller, less, less important, etc.; lessen; reduce.
2.
Architecture. to give (a column) a form tapering inward from bottom to top.
3.
Music. to make (an interval) smaller by a chromatic half step than the corresponding perfect or minor interval.
4.
to detract from the authority, honor, stature, or reputation of; disparage.
verb (used without object)
5.
to lessen; decrease.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English; blend of diminuen (< Anglo-French diminuer < Medieval Latin dīminuere for Latin dēminuere to make smaller) and minishen minish
Related forms
diminishable, adjective
diminishment, noun
nondiminishing, adjective
prediminish, verb (used with object)
prediminishment, noun
undiminishable, adjective
undiminishableness, noun
undiminishably, adverb
undiminished, adjective
undiminishing, adjective
Synonyms
5. See decrease.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for diminishing
  • Then they begin to taper off, diminishing in frequency over the next several days.
  • As the maximum of condensation is approached it is going up with diminishing maximum velocity.
  • Thirty-five bottles of red followed by crystal meth seems to have diminishing returns.
  • But his own witness testified there was no scientifically established causal link between file-sharing and diminishing revenues.
  • As for bandwidth, its cost shows no sign of diminishing to zero.
  • For more than a decade, state-government support for higher education has been diminishing.
  • Even as he excelled in his work, opportunities within his field were diminishing.
  • With diminishing state support for post-secondary education, universities now value dollar generation above all else.
  • Sure, more education means better employment than less education, but the law of diminishing returns applies.
  • The diminishing private sector cannot sustain all of this government growth.
British Dictionary definitions for diminishing

diminish

/dɪˈmɪnɪʃ/
verb
1.
to make or become smaller, fewer, or less
2.
(transitive) (architect) to cause (a column, etc) to taper
3.
(transitive) (music) to decrease (a minor or perfect interval) by a semitone
4.
to belittle or be belittled; reduce in authority, status, etc; depreciate
Derived Forms
diminishable, adjective
diminishingly, adverb
diminishment, noun
Word Origin
C15: blend of diminuen to lessen (from Latin dēminuere to make smaller, from minuere to reduce) + archaic minish to lessen
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for diminishing

diminish

v.

early 15c., from merger of two obsolete verbs, diminue and minish. Diminue is from Old French diminuer "make small," from Latin diminuere "break into small pieces," variant of deminuere "lessen, diminish," from de- "completely" + minuere "make small" (see minus).

Minish is from Old French menuisier, from Latin minuere. Related: Diminished; diminishes; diminishing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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