directive

[dih-rek-tiv, dahy-]
adjective
1.
serving to direct; directing: a directive board.
2.
Psychology. pertaining to a type of psychotherapy in which the therapist actively offers advice and information rather than dealing only with information supplied by the patient.
noun
3.
an authoritative instruction or direction; specific order: a new directive by the president on foreign aid.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English < Medieval Latin dīrēctīvus. See direct, -ive

self-directive, adjective
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World English Dictionary
directive (dɪˈrɛktɪv, daɪ-)
 
n
1.  an instruction; order
 
adj
2.  tending to direct; directing
3.  indicating direction

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

directive
1590s (adj.); 1640s (n.); from M.L. directivus, from direct-, pp. stem of dirigere (see direct).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Neither the president nor the vice president is mentioned in the new directive
  as being part of the chain of command.
Management would never act against their own financial interests without a
  strict directive from the regulatory agency.
Followed your directive and found no zero propaganda in the comments section.
He fulfilled the actor's prime directive, to keep busy.
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