dis loyalty

disloyalty

[dis-loi-uhl-tee]
noun, plural disloyalties.
1.
the quality of being disloyal; lack of loyalty; unfaithfulness.
2.
violation of allegiance or duty, as to a government.
3.
a disloyal act.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French desloiaute, Old French desleaute, equivalent to desleal disloyal + -te -ty2


1. faithlessness, subversion. Disloyalty, perfidy, treachery, treason imply betrayal of trust. Disloyalty applies to any violation of loyalty, whether to a person, a cause, or one's country, and whether in thought or in deeds: to suspect disloyalty in a friend. Perfidy implies deliberate breaking of faith or of one's pledges and promises, on which others are relying: It is an act of perfidy to cheat innocent people. Treachery implies being secretly traitorous but seeming friendly and loyal: In treachery deceit is added to disloyalty. Treason is performing overt acts to help the enemies of one's country or government: Acting to aid a hostile power is treason.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
disloyalty (dɪsˈlɔɪəltɪ)
 
n , pl -ties
the condition or an instance of being unfaithful or disloyal

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disloyalty
early 15c., from M.Fr. desloyaulte, from O.Fr. desloialteit, from desloial (see disloyal).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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