dis-gust

disgust

[dis-guhst, dih-skuhst]
verb (used with object)
1.
to cause loathing or nausea in.
2.
to offend the good taste, moral sense, etc., of; cause extreme dislike or revulsion in: Your vulgar remarks disgust me.
noun
3.
a strong distaste; nausea; loathing.
4.
repugnance caused by something offensive; strong aversion: He left the room in disgust.

Origin:
1590–1600; (v.) < Middle French desgouster, equivalent to des- dis-1 + gouster to taste, relish, derivative of goust taste < Latin gusta (see choose); (noun) < Middle French desgoust, derivative of the v.

disgustedly, adverb
disgustedness, noun
predisgust, noun
quasi-disgusted, adjective
quasi-disgustedly, adverb
self-disgust, noun
undisgusted, adjective

discussed, disgust.


1. sicken, nauseate. 2. repel, revolt. 4. abhorrence, detestation, antipathy. See dislike.


1. delight. 4. relish.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
disgust (dɪsˈɡʌst)
 
vb
1.  to sicken or fill with loathing
2.  to offend the moral sense, principles, or taste of
 
n
3.  a great loathing or distaste aroused by someone or something
4.  in disgust as a result of disgust
 
[C16: from Old French desgouster, from des-dis-1 + gouster to taste, from goust taste, from Latin gustus]
 
dis'gustedly
 
adv
 
dis'gustedness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disgust
1590s, from M.Fr. desgoust "strong dislike, repugnance," lit. "distaste," from desgouster "have a distaste for," from des- "opposite of" + gouster "taste," from L. gustare "to taste" (see gusto). Sense has strengthened over time, and subject and object have been reversed:
cf. "It is not very palatable, which makes some disgust it" (1660s), while the reverse sense of "to excite nausea" is attested from c.1650. Related: Disgusted; disgusting.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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