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disadvantaged

[dis-uh d-van-tijd, -vahn-] /ˌdɪs ədˈvæn tɪdʒd, -ˈvɑn-/
adjective
1.
lacking the normal or usual necessities and comforts of life, as proper housing, educational opportunities, job security, adequate medical care, etc.:
The government extends help to disadvantaged minorities.
noun
2.
(used with a plural verb) disadvantaged persons collectively (usually preceded by the):
The senator advocates increased funding for federal programs that aid the disadvantaged.
Origin
1930-1935
1930-35; disadvantage + -ed2
Related forms
disadvantagedness, noun
nondisadvantaged, adjective, noun
Synonyms
1. poor, underprivileged, impoverished, deprived; handicapped, impaired, disabled, challenged.

disadvantage

[dis-uh d-van-tij, -vahn-] /ˌdɪs ədˈvæn tɪdʒ, -ˈvɑn-/
noun
1.
absence or deprivation of advantage or equality.
2.
the state or an instance of being in an unfavorable circumstance or condition:
to be at a disadvantage.
3.
something that puts one in an unfavorable position or condition:
His bad temper is a disadvantage.
4.
injury to interest, reputation, credit, profit, etc.; loss:
Your behavior is a disadvantage to your family's good name.
verb (used with object), disadvantaged, disadvantaging.
5.
to subject to disadvantage:
I was disadvantaged by illness.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English disavauntage < Anglo-French; Old French desavantage. See dis-1, advantage
Synonyms
1. drawback, inconvenience, hindrance. 4. detriment, hurt, harm, damage.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for disadvantaged
  • But our fundamental goals must be to reduce dependency and upgrade the dignity of those who are infirm or disadvantaged.
  • Some agrotourism venues serve to encourage and protect threatened agrarian communities in disadvantaged countries.
  • The money is earmarked for bringing more guest writers on board, as well as scholarships for disadvantaged students.
  • It really is an ugly thing to say, about traditionally disadvantaged groups.
  • In our technologically advanced society even those who are genetically disadvantaged have a good chance at reproduction.
  • There are many opportunities that are available to every disadvantaged community.
  • They feel disadvantaged, and they feel marginalized.
  • They take for granted that disadvantaged students will remain concentrated together.
  • Substantial co-pays would need to be means-tested, so that those without resources would not be disadvantaged.
  • They feel obliged to be in support of rent control, for example, because it helps the poor and the disadvantaged.
British Dictionary definitions for disadvantaged

disadvantaged

/ˌdɪsədˈvɑːntɪdʒd/
adjective
1.
socially or economically deprived or discriminated against

disadvantage

/ˌdɪsədˈvɑːntɪdʒ/
noun
1.
an unfavourable circumstance, state of affairs, thing, person, etc
2.
injury, loss, or detriment
3.
an unfavourable condition or situation (esp in the phrase at a disadvantage)
verb
4.
(transitive) to put at a disadvantage; handicap
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for disadvantaged
disadvantage
late 14c., from Fr. desavantage (13c.); see dis- + advantage. The verb is attested from 1530s, from the noun.
disadvantaged
1610s, pp. adj. from disadvantage. Of races or classes deprived of opportunities for advancement, from 1902, a word popularized by sociologists. As a noun, shorthand for disadvantaged persons, it is attested by 1939.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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