disavow

[dis-uh-vou]
verb (used with object)
to disclaim knowledge of, connection with, or responsibility for; disown; repudiate: He disavowed the remark that had been attributed to him.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English disavouen, desavouen < Anglo-French, Old French desavouer. See dis-1, avow

disavowedly, adverb
disavower, noun


deny, reject, disclaim.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To disavowed
Collins
World English Dictionary
disavow (ˌdɪsəˈvaʊ)
 
vb
(tr) to deny knowledge of, connection with, or responsibility for
 
disa'vowal
 
n
 
disa'vowedly
 
adv
 
disa'vower
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disavow
late 14c., from dis- "opposite of" (see dis-) + avow. Related: Disavowed.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
So it could be used by a noisy group he would have disavowed for their tactics
  and there's nothing anyone could say about it.
It is only disavowed by those attempting to hijack the curriculum to a theistic
  base.
She will not consent to have it hidden or disavowed.
Come on, he does not owe her an apology, and nor do his remarks need to be
  disavowed.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;