discomfiture

[dis-kuhm-fi-cher]
noun
1.
disconcertion; confusion; embarrassment.
2.
frustration of hopes or plans.
3.
Archaic. defeat in battle; rout.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English desconfiture < Anglo-French: defeat. See discomfit, -ure

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To discomfiture
Collins
World English Dictionary
discomfit (dɪsˈkʌmfɪt)
 
vb
1.  to make uneasy, confused, or embarrassed
2.  to frustrate the plans or purpose of
3.  archaic to defeat in battle
 
[C14: from Old French desconfire to destroy, from des- (indicating reversal) + confire to make, from Latin conficere to produce; see confect]
 
dis'comfiter
 
n
 
dis'comfiture
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

discomfiture
M.E., from O.Fr. desconfiture "rout, defeat" (12c.; Mod. Fr. déconfiture), from M.L. disconficere "to rout, overthrow" (see discomfit).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
It is being established by archaeological and philological research, much to the discomfiture of the modern joker.
Feel free to explain your discomfiture to the acquiring editor, if you can do so briefly and pleasantly.
The disembodied mirth on the intercom is the control-room technicians having a chuckle over my brief discomfiture.
Discomfiture over the personal behavior of acclaimed artists is of course hardly new.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;