discontinue

[dis-kuhn-tin-yoo]
verb (used with object), discontinued, discontinuing.
1.
to put an end to; stop; terminate: to discontinue nuclear testing.
2.
to cease to take, use, subscribe to, etc.: to discontinue a newspaper.
3.
Law. to terminate or abandon (a suit, claim, or the like).
verb (used without object), discontinued, discontinuing.
4.
to come to an end or stop; cease; desist.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Anglo-French discontinuer < Medieval Latin discontinuāre. See dis-1, continue

discontinuer, noun
undiscontinued, adjective


1. See interrupt.


1. resume.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
discontinue (ˌdɪskənˈtɪnjuː)
 
vb , -ues, -uing, -ued
1.  to come or bring to an end; interrupt or be interrupted; stop
2.  (tr) law to terminate or abandon (an action, suit, etc)
 
discon'tinuance
 
n
 
discontinu'ation
 
n
 
discon'tinuer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

discontinue
late 15c., from O.Fr. discontinuer (14c.), from M.L. discontinuare, from dis- "not" (see dis-) + continuare "to continue" (see continue). Related: Discontinued; discontinuity; discontinuous.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The suppression of unnecessary offices, of useless establishments and expenses,
  enabled us to discontinue our internal taxes.
Some began combing their inventories for brands they could discontinue.
It somewhat depends on whether these attacks will discontinue or if other
  things happen.
They should probably discontinue all aerobic exercise in favor of high
  resistance work.
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