discontinue

[dis-kuhn-tin-yoo]
verb (used with object), discontinued, discontinuing.
1.
to put an end to; stop; terminate: to discontinue nuclear testing.
2.
to cease to take, use, subscribe to, etc.: to discontinue a newspaper.
3.
Law. to terminate or abandon (a suit, claim, or the like).
verb (used without object), discontinued, discontinuing.
4.
to come to an end or stop; cease; desist.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Anglo-French discontinuer < Medieval Latin discontinuāre. See dis-1, continue

discontinuer, noun
undiscontinued, adjective


1. See interrupt.


1. resume.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
discontinue (ˌdɪskənˈtɪnjuː)
 
vb , -ues, -uing, -ued
1.  to come or bring to an end; interrupt or be interrupted; stop
2.  (tr) law to terminate or abandon (an action, suit, etc)
 
discon'tinuance
 
n
 
discontinu'ation
 
n
 
discon'tinuer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

discontinue
late 15c., from O.Fr. discontinuer (14c.), from M.L. discontinuare, from dis- "not" (see dis-) + continuare "to continue" (see continue). Related: Discontinued; discontinuity; discontinuous.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
However, if for any reason payments were discontinued, the bodies were removed
  from their tombs to free up more space.
Don't miss out on this item, or color gravel because it's been discontinued.
My efforts must soon be crowned with success, or discontinued.
Even ordinary household work, including cooking, is discontinued.
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