discursive

[dih-skur-siv]
adjective
1.
passing aimlessly from one subject to another; digressive; rambling.
2.
proceeding by reasoning or argument rather than intuition.

Origin:
1590–1600; < Medieval Latin discursīvus. See discourse, -ive

discursively, adverb
discursiveness, noun
nondiscursive, adjective
nondiscursively, adverb
nondiscursiveness, noun


1. wandering, long-winded, prolix.
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World English Dictionary
discursive (dɪˈskɜːsɪv)
 
adj
1.  passing from one topic to another, usually in an unmethodical way; digressive
2.  philosophy Compare dianoetic of or relating to knowledge obtained by reason and argument rather than intuition
 
[C16: from Medieval Latin discursīvus, from Late Latin discursusdiscourse]
 
dis'cursively
 
adv
 
dis'cursiveness
 
n

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

discursive
1590s, from M.Fr. discursif, from M.L. discursivus, from L. discursus "a running about" (see discourse). Related: Discursively.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Further, what words "mean" alters by cultural, political and
  discursive context.
Disputes about who has 'faith' or not seem to me to be a discursive cul-de-sac.
Ultimately, the film is as flat as the discursive fiction on which it is based.
How he did it is a fascinating, discursive story.
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