disgruntled

[dis-gruhn-tld]
adjective
displeased and discontented; sulky; peevish: Her disgruntled husband refused to join us.

Origin:
disgruntle + -ed2


grouchy, testy, sullen, grumpy, dissatisfied.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

disgruntle

[dis-gruhn-tl]
verb (used with object), disgruntled, disgruntling.
to put into a state of sulky dissatisfaction; make discontent.

Origin:
1675–85; dis-1 + gruntle, frequentative of grunt

disgruntlement, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
disgruntle (dɪsˈɡrʌntəl)
 
vb
(tr; usually passive) to make sulky or discontented
 
[C17: dis-1 + obsolete gruntle to complain; see grunt]
 
dis'gruntlement
 
n

disgruntled (dɪsˈɡrʌntəld)
 
adj
feeling or expressing discontent or anger

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disgruntle
1680s, from dis- "entirely, very" + obs. gruntle "to grumble," frequentative of grunt (q.v.).

disgruntled
pp. adj. from disgruntle.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Every program has its disgruntled students.
In all likelihood, this will all play out in front of said disgruntled patients
  and anyone else who happens to be passing.
The disgruntled customer enters a tape-recording booth and tells his grievances
  to a machine.
By then most of the disgruntled fans had left.
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