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dispirit

[dih-spir-it] /dɪˈspɪr ɪt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to deprive of spirit, hope, enthusiasm, etc.; depress; discourage; dishearten.
Origin of dispirit
1635-1645
1635-45; di-2 + spirit
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for dispiriting
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • For three weary, discouraging days they pressed onward through the dispiriting rain and over all the exhausting obstacles.

    The Red Acorn John McElroy
  • It was two hours before he returned, and the news he brought was dispiriting.

    A Girl of the Commune George Alfred Henty
  • The doors necessarily stood open a great deal, the rooms grew very cold, everything was comfortless and dispiriting.

    Just Sixteen. Susan Coolidge
  • Not sad or dispiriting by any means, but briskly enlivening was their lay.

    She and I, Volume 2 John Conroy Hutcheson
  • Horrible is the battle, but more horrible by far is the dispiriting agony of the retreat.

    The Wonder of War on Land Francis Rolt-Wheeler
British Dictionary definitions for dispiriting

dispiriting

/dɪˈspɪrɪtɪŋ/
adjective
1.
tending to lower the spirit or enthusiasm; depressing; discouraging
Derived Forms
dispiritingly, adverb

dispirit

/dɪˈspɪrɪt/
verb
1.
(transitive) to lower the spirit or enthusiasm of; make downhearted or depressed; discourage
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dispiriting

dispirit

v.

1640s; see dis- + spirit (n.). Related: Dispirited; dispiriting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Word Value for dispiriting

15
18
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