disregard

[dis-ri-gahrd]
verb (used with object)
1.
to pay no attention to; leave out of consideration; ignore: Disregard the footnotes.
2.
to treat without due regard, respect, or attentiveness; slight: to disregard an invitation.
noun
3.
lack of regard or attention; neglect.
4.
lack of due or respectful regard.

Origin:
1635–45; dis-1 + regard

disregardable, adjective
disregarder, noun


1. ignore. 2. insult. See slight. 3. inattention, oversight. 4. disrespect, slight.


1. notice.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
disregard (ˌdɪsrɪˈɡɑːd)
 
vb
1.  to give little or no attention to; ignore
2.  to treat as unworthy of consideration or respect
 
n
3.  lack of attention or respect
4.  (often plural) social welfare capital or income which is not counted in calculating the amount payable to a claimant for a means-tested benefit
 
disre'garder
 
n
 
disre'gardful
 
adj
 
disre'gardfully
 
adv
 
disre'gardfulness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disregard
1641, from dis- + regard (q.v.). Related: Disregarded; disregarding.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The problems with her family dogs arose when her parents disregarded those
  instincts.
What is outside, or persons not identifiable with ourselves, has been
  disregarded or resented.
Some brave birds disregarded the novel intrusion and dived right into their
  feed within seconds.
At a certain point, they're cheap enough to be safely disregarded.
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