dissertation

[dis-er-tey-shuhn]
noun
1.
a written essay, treatise, or thesis, especially one written by a candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.
2.
any formal discourse in speech or writing.

Origin:
1605–15; < Latin dissertātiōn- (stem of dissertātiō), equivalent to dissertāt(us) (past participle of dissertāre; dissert- (see dissert) + -ātus -ate1) + -iōn- -ion

dissertational, adjective
dissertationist, noun

dissertation, thesis.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
dissertation (ˌdɪsəˈteɪʃən)
 
n
1.  a written thesis, often based on original research, usually required for a higher degree
2.  a formal discourse
 
disser'tational
 
adj
 
disser'tationist
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dissertation
1611, from L. dissertationem (nom. dissertatio) "discourse," from dissertare "debate, argue," frequentative of disserere "discuss, examine," from dis- "apart" + serere "to arrange words" (see series). Sense of "formal, written treatise" is 1651.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
There were dissertations on the bookshelves from his former graduate students.
She found herself skipping his military dissertations, which were still as long
  and written in as handsome a hand as ever.
Walk into the office of any editor at a university press and you will see
  dissertations stacked in piles, dozens of them.
There's a reason that starve the beast has no curves, formulas or doctoral
  dissertations to clothe its nakedness.
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