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dissipate

[dis-uh-peyt] /ˈdɪs əˌpeɪt/
verb (used with object), dissipated, dissipating.
1.
to scatter in various directions; disperse; dispel.
2.
to spend or use wastefully or extravagantly; squander; deplete:
to dissipate one's talents; to dissipate a fortune on high living.
verb (used without object), dissipated, dissipating.
3.
to become scattered or dispersed; be dispelled; disintegrate:
The sun shone and the mist dissipated.
4.
to indulge in extravagant, intemperate, or dissolute pleasure.
Origin
1525-1535
1525-35; < Latin dissipātus (past participle of dissipāre, dissupāre to scatter); see -ate1
Related forms
dissipater, dissipator, noun
dissipative, adjective
dissipativity
[dis-uh-puh-tiv-i-tee] /ˌdɪs ə pəˈtɪv ɪ ti/ (Show IPA),
noun
nondissipative, adjective
Synonyms
1. See scatter. 3. disappear, vanish.
Antonyms
1, 3. unite.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for dissipate
  • There is a simple rule of thumb that can be applied toward multiple solutions: don't expend energy in order to dissipate energy.
  • It will probably make the pain dissipate faster.
  • First of all, tornadoes go through changes before they dissipate.
  • Ranchers' historic animosity toward a predator like the jaguar doesn't dissipate easily.
  • The resistors capture and dissipate excess energy from the motors.
  • Merely closing the bathroom door and opening a window will dissipate excess water vapor resulting from tub bathing or showering.
  • Most oil that is not recovered will either sink or dissipate in the water.
  • They form, then dissipate quickly.
  • Radio waves, he points out, go out to space and never dissipate.
  • His legislative influence may dissipate within two years; his leadership potential may end after four.
British Dictionary definitions for dissipate

dissipate

/ˈdɪsɪˌpeɪt/
verb
1.
to exhaust or be exhausted by dispersion
2.
(transitive) to scatter or break up
3.
(intransitive) to indulge in the pursuit of pleasure
Derived Forms
dissipater, dissipator, noun
dissipative, adjective
Word Origin
C15: from Latin dissipāre to disperse, from dis-1 + supāre to throw
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dissipate
v.

early 15c., from Latin dissipatus, past participle of dissipare "to spread abroad, scatter, disperse; squander, disintegrate," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + supare "to throw, scatter," from PIE *swep- "to throw, sling, cast" (cf. Lithuanian supu "to swing, rock," Old Church Slavonic supo "to strew"). Related: Dissipated; dissipates; dissipating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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