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[dih-soh-shee-eyt, -see-] /dɪˈsoʊ ʃiˌeɪt, -si-/
verb (used with object), dissociated, dissociating.
to sever the association of (oneself); separate:
He tried to dissociate himself from the bigotry in his past.
to subject to dissociation.
verb (used without object), dissociated, dissociating.
to withdraw from association.
to undergo dissociation.
Origin of dissociate
1605-15; dis-1 + (as)sociate, modeled on Latin dissociātus, past participle of dissociāre to divide, sever
Related forms
dissociative, adjective
Can be confused
disassociate, dissociate. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for dissociate
Contemporary Examples
  • He could mimic printed text with alarming accuracy and dissociate the shapes and lines from their inherent meanings.

Historical Examples
  • "I became, if I may go express it, dissociate from Bedford," he writes.

    H. G. Wells J. D. Beresford
  • That is, theoretically we may ascribe them to God, but practically we dissociate Him from them.

  • But if it is the truth, as I expect to establish it, then you must dissociate yourself from him, Ralph.

    The Seven Secrets William Le Queux
  • From that lack of confidence he would like at once to dissociate himself.

    Five Tales John Galsworthy
  • It is difficult, at least, to dissociate those ceremonies from the ritual of first-fruits.

  • It is true, he has renounced that folly; but it is not so easy to dissociate him from the recollection.

    Gryll Grange Thomas Love Peacock
  • Generally upon such occasions, although he saw his watcher, he could not dissociate him from the dream, and went raving on.

    The Princess and Curdie George MacDonald
  • He does not yet know enough about the matter to dissociate the player from the part.

  • We look with prejudice on the stranger whom we dissociate, and receive with prestige the stranger who is dissociated.

British Dictionary definitions for dissociate


/dɪˈsəʊʃɪˌeɪt; -sɪ-/
to break or cause to break the association between (people, organizations, etc)
(transitive) to regard or treat as separate or unconnected
to undergo or subject to dissociation
Derived Forms
dissociative, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dissociate

1610s (implied in dissociated), from Latin dissociatus, past participle of dissociare "to separate from companionship, disunite, set at variance," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + sociare "to join," from socius "companion" (see social (adj.)). Attested from 1540s as a past participle adjective meaning "separated."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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