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[dih-sweyd] /dɪˈsweɪd/
verb (used with object), dissuaded, dissuading.
to deter by advice or persuasion; persuade not to do something (often followed by from):
She dissuaded him from leaving home.
Archaic. to advise or urge against:
to dissuade an action.
Origin of dissuade
1505-15; < Latin dissuādēre, equivalent to dis- dis-1 + suādēre to recommend, urge, derivative of suād-, base of suāvis tasting agreeable; see suave
Related forms
dissuadable, adjective
dissuader, noun
predissuade, verb (used with object), predissuaded, predissuading.
undissuadable, adjective Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for dissuade
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • From this Mr. Burke tried to dissuade us, but what he told us naturally increased our wish to go.

  • Beecot shook his head and strove to dissuade her from entertaining this idea.

    The Opal Serpent Fergus Hume
  • Later, however, she became resigned and did not try to dissuade her husband from accompanying the fallen Emperor.

    Napoleon's Young Neighbor Helen Leah Reed
  • Her friends did every thing in their power to dissuade her from returning.

  • My client assured me that he not only had no hand in robbing the mail, but that he tried to dissuade his companions from doing so.

    The First Violin Jessie Fothergill
British Dictionary definitions for dissuade


verb (transitive)
(often foll by from) to deter (someone) by persuasion from a course of action, policy, etc
to advise against (an action, etc)
Derived Forms
dissuadable, adjective
dissuader, noun
dissuasion, noun
dissuasive, adjective
dissuasively, adverb
dissuasiveness, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Latin dissuādēre, from dis-1 + suādēre to persuade
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dissuade

1510s, from Middle French dissuader and directly from Latin dissuadere "to advise against, oppose by argument," from dis- "off, against" (see dis-) + suadere "to urge" (see suasion). Related: Dissuaded; dissuading.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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