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diverge

[dih-vurj, dahy-] /dɪˈvɜrdʒ, daɪ-/
verb (used without object), diverged, diverging.
1.
to move, lie, or extend in different directions from a common point; branch off.
2.
to differ in opinion, character, form, etc.; deviate.
3.
Mathematics. (of a sequence, series, etc.) to have no unique limit; to have infinity as a limit.
4.
to turn aside or deviate, as from a path, practice, or plan.
verb (used with object), diverged, diverging.
5.
to deflect or turn aside.
Origin
1655-1665
1655-65; < Medieval Latin dīvergere, equivalent to Latin dī- di-2 + vergere to incline
Related forms
nondiverging, adjective
undiverging, adjective
Can be confused
digress, diverge, diverse.
Synonyms
1. separate, deviate, fork. 4. See deviate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for diverging
  • Beneath the diverging air, surface pressure drops and an equatorial trough develops.
  • Between the two lies an abyss separating two cultures, two habits of mind, two diverging tongues.
  • Everybody must have discerned in the action of his mind two diverging tendencies, which in this novel, are harmonized.
  • Surveys of leisure habits often show diverging results.
  • Disagreement about other matters arose from diverging visions of the postwar world.
  • Yet the interests of the family and those of the firm are diverging.
  • Structurally, too, the next society is already diverging from the society almost all of us still live in.
  • But when the authors compared the two groups, they found they were diverging.
  • Core and periphery have seriously diverging views on the direction policy should take.
  • At bottom, the differences reflect each country's diverging worldview.
British Dictionary definitions for diverging

diverge

/daɪˈvɜːdʒ/
verb
1.
to separate or cause to separate and go in different directions from a point
2.
(intransitive) to be at variance; differ: our opinions diverge
3.
(intransitive) to deviate from a prescribed course
4.
(intransitive) (maths) (of a series or sequence) to have no limit
Word Origin
C17: from Medieval Latin dīvergere, from Latin di-² + vergere to turn
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for diverging

diverge

v.

1660s, from Modern Latin divergere "go in different directions," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + vergere "to bend, turn" (see verge (v.)). Originally a term in optics; the figurative sense is 19c. Related: Diverged; diverging.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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