docile

[dos-uhl; British doh-sahyl]
adjective
1.
easily managed or handled; tractable: a docile horse.
2.
readily trained or taught; teachable.

Origin:
1475–85; < Latin docilis readily taught, equivalent to doc(ēre) to teach + -ilis -ile

docilely, adverb
docility [do-sil-i-tee, doh-] , noun


1. manageable, malleable; obedient.
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World English Dictionary
docile (ˈdəʊsaɪl)
 
adj
1.  easy to manage, control, or discipline; submissive
2.  rare ready to learn; easy to teach
 
[C15: from Latin docilis easily taught, from docēre to teach]
 
'docilely
 
adv
 
docility
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

docile
late 15c., from It. or Fr. docile, from L. docilis "easily taught," from docere "teach" (see doctor). Sense of "obedient, submissive" first recorded 1774.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
She is tired of patience and gentleness and docility.
Research on foxes in fur farms suggests that such body shapes are a side-effect
  of breeding for docility.
They breed for docility and production, not cold-hardiness.
The unions' earlier militancy is the main reason for their relative docility
  today.
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