dodger

[doj-er]
noun
1.
a person who dodges.
2.
a shifty person, especially one who persistently evades a responsibility, as specified: tax dodger; draft dodger.
3.
a leafhopper.
4.
a small handbill; throwaway.
5.
Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. corn dodger.
6.
Nautical. a shield, as of canvas, erected on a flying bridge to protect persons on watch from wind, flying spray, etc.
7.
Australian. a large slice, lump, or portion of food, especially of bread.

Origin:
1560–70; dodge + -er1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To dodgers
Collins
World English Dictionary
dodger (ˈdɒdʒə)
 
n
1.  a person who evades or shirks
2.  a shifty dishonest person
3.  a canvas shelter, mounted on a ship's bridge or over the companionway of a sailing yacht to protect the helmsman from bad weather
4.  archaic (US), (Austral) a handbill
5.  informal (Austral) food, esp bread

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dodger
1560s, "one who dodges," in the literal or figurative (especially underworld) senses of dodge. The U.S. word meaning "corn cake" is recorded from 1831.

Dodgers
U.S. baseball club, originally based in Brooklyn, N.Y., so called from 1900, from trolley dodgers, Manhattanites' nickname for Brooklyn residents, in reference to the streetcar lines that criss-crossed the borough.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature