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Marquis

[mahr-kwis] /ˈmɑr kwɪs/
noun
1.
Don(ald Robert Perry) 1878–1937, U.S. humorist and poet.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for don marquis
Historical Examples
  • But don marquis's mind has two yolks (to use one of his favourite denunciations).

    Shandygaff Christopher Morley
  • And using the word ephemeral in its strict sense, don marquis is unquestionably the cleverest of our ephemeral philosophers.

    Shandygaff Christopher Morley
  • don marquis is a real name, not a pseudonym; it is pronounced Markwiss, not Markee.

    Modern Essays John Macy
  • I wish don marquis kept a diary, but I am quite sure he doesn't.

  • don marquis has something of Dobsonian cunning to set his musings to delicate, austere music.

    Shandygaff Christopher Morley
  • don marquis recognizes as well as any one the value of the slapstick as a mirth-provoking instrument.

    Shandygaff Christopher Morley
British Dictionary definitions for don marquis

marquis

/ˈmɑːkwɪs; mɑːˈkiː; French marki/
noun (pl) -quises, -quis
1.
(in various countries) a nobleman ranking above a count, corresponding to a British marquess. The title of marquis is often used in place of that of marquess
Word Origin
C14: from Old French marchis, literally: count of the march, from marchemarch²

Marquis

/ˈmɑːkwɪs/
noun
1.
Don(ald Robert Perry). 1878–1937, US humorist; author of archy and mehitabel (1927)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for don marquis

marquis

n.

also marquess, c.1300, title of nobility, from Old French marchis, literally "ruler of a border area," from Old French marche "frontier," from Medieval Latin marca "frontier, frontier territory" (see march (n.1)). Originally the ruler of border territories in various European regions (e.g. Italian marchese, Spanish marqués); later a mere title of rank, below duke and above count. Related: Marquisate.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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