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dote

[doht] /doʊt/
verb (used without object), doted, doting. Also, doat
1.
to bestow or express excessive love or fondness habitually (usually followed by on or upon):
They dote on their youngest daughter.
2.
to show a decline of mental faculties, especially associated with old age.
noun
3.
decay of wood.
Origin of dote
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English doten to behave foolishly, become feeble-minded; cognate with Middle Dutch doten.
Related forms
doter, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for dote
Historical Examples
  • You must know that I dote upon that girl, and that consequently I am interested in you.

  • Well, what will women not swear to, to save those they dote upon!'

  • He has escaped: to follow him is to die; and where should we learn to dote on death unterrified, if not in Rome?

    Shelley John Addington Symonds
  • "I dote on 'em," comes back the Dowager, and "my daughter" owned up that she "adored" 'em.

    Cape Cod Stories Joseph C. Lincoln
  • I dote upon chaperones; and by coming with this family, I had Mrs. Twamberley to matronize me.

    Pencil Sketches Eliza Leslie
  • Nobody knows him like me; and if there was ever one made for him to dote on, it's your own self.

  • Never, for her mother's sake, suffer my heart again to be softened by an object I might dote upon.

    A Simple Story Mrs. Inchbald
  • Besides, by partial fondness shown, Like you, we dote upon our own.

    Welsh Folk-Lore Elias Owen
  • Because we love each other, would that be any reason why we must dote upon each other, or sink from our high resolves?

    Love's Pilgrimage Upton Sinclair
  • "Yet it would be classical to dote upon a mermaid," Caius murmured.

    The Mermaid Lily Dougall
British Dictionary definitions for dote

dote

/dəʊt/
verb (intransitive)
1.
foll by on or upon. to love to an excessive or foolish degree
2.
to be foolish or weak-minded, esp as a result of old age
Derived Forms
doter, (now rarely) doater, noun
Word Origin
C13: related to Middle Dutch doten to be silly, Norwegian dudra to shake
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dote
v.

c.1200, "to be feeble-minded from age," from Middle Low German doten "be foolish," of unknown origin. Meaning "to be infatuated" is from late 15c. Related: Doted; dotes; doting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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