dourly

dour

[door, douuhr, dou-er]
adjective
1.
sullen; gloomy: The captain's dour look depressed us all.
2.
severe; stern: His dour criticism made us regret having undertaken the job.
3.
Scot. (of land) barren; rocky, infertile, or otherwise difficult or impossible to cultivate.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English < Latin dūrus dure1

dourly, adverb
dourness, noun


1. morose, sour, moody. See glum.
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World English Dictionary
dour (dʊə, ˈdaʊə)
 
adj
1.  sullen
2.  hard or obstinate
 
[C14: probably from Latin dūrus hard]
 
'dourly
 
adv
 
'dourness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

dour
late 14c., "severe," from Scottish and northern England dialect, probably from L. durus "hard" (see endure); sense of "gloomy" is late 15c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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