downcast

[doun-kast, -kahst]
adjective
1.
directed downward, as the eyes.
2.
dejected in spirit; depressed.
noun
3.
overthrow or ruin.
4.
a downward look or glance.
5.
a shaft down which air passes, as into a mine (opposed to upcast ).

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English douncasten. See down1, cast

downcastly, adverb
downcastness, noun


2. sad, desolate, disconsolate; low, blue.
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World English Dictionary
downcast (ˈdaʊnˌkɑːst)
 
adj
1.  dejected
2.  (esp of the eyes) directed downwards
 
n
3.  mining a ventilation shaft
4.  geology another word for downthrow

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

downcast
c.1600, from pp. of obs. verb downcast (c.1300), from down (adv.) + cast (v.). Literal at first; figurative sense is 1630s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
We were downcast for a while after receiving the discouraging news.
Still, the private-equity boss was by no means downcast as he sharpened his axe.
But colleagues said he did not seem downcast and usually appeared happy.
The record shows that she sat through the hearing in silence, her arms folded,
  her eyes downcast.
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