downward

[doun-werd]
adverb
1.
Also, downwards. from a higher to a lower place or condition.
2.
down from a source or beginning: As the river flows downward, it widens.
3.
from a past time, predecessor, or ancestor: The estate was handed downward from generation to generation.
adjective
4.
moving or tending to a lower place or condition.
5.
descending from a source or beginning.

Origin:
1150–1200; Middle English dounward, aphetic variant of adounward, Old English adūnweard. See down1, -ward

downwardly, adverb
downwardness, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
downward (ˈdaʊnwəd)
 
adj
1.  descending from a higher to a lower level, condition, position, etc
2.  descending from a beginning
 
adv
3.  a variant of downwards
 
'downwardly
 
adv
 
'downwardness
 
n

downwards or downward (ˈdaʊnwədz)
 
adv
1.  from a higher to a lower place, level, etc
2.  from an earlier time or source to a later: from the Tudors downwards
 
downward or downward
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

downward
c.1200, from down (adv.) + -ward.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The fires burn downward, acquiring air through fissures in rock and microscopic
  spaces between grains of dirt.
One fourth to one half of the annual rainfall percolates downward, becoming
  groundwater.
She had me in a chair that rotated so my head was slanted downward and she
  could get at the area.
When the coating cracks, the cracks spread downward and reach the underlying
  channels, which ooze out healing agent.
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