dragon-root

Dictionary.com Unabridged

dragon

[drag-uhn]
noun
1.
a mythical monster generally represented as a huge, winged reptile with crested head and enormous claws and teeth, and often spouting fire.
2.
Archaic. a huge serpent or snake.
3.
Bible. a large animal, possibly a large snake or crocodile.
4.
the dragon, Satan.
5.
a fierce, violent person.
6.
a very watchful and strict woman.
8.
Botany. any of several araceous plants, as Arisaema dracontium (green dragon or dragonroot) the flowers of which have a long, slender spadix and a green, shorter spathe.
9.
a short musket carried by a mounted infantryman in the 16th and 17th centuries.
10.
a soldier armed with such a musket.
11.
(initial capital letter) Astronomy. the constellation Draco.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Latin dracōn- (stem of dracō) < Greek drákōn kind of serpent, probably orig. epithet, the (sharp-)sighted one, akin to dérkesthai to look

dragonish, adjective
dragonlike, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
dragon (ˈdræɡən)
 
n
1.  a mythical monster usually represented as breathing fire and having a scaly reptilian body, wings, claws, and a long tail
2.  informal a fierce or intractable person, esp a woman
3.  any of various very large lizards, esp the Komodo dragon
4.  any of various North American aroid plants, esp the green dragon
5.  Christianity a manifestation of Satan or an attendant devil
6.  a yacht of the International Dragon Class, 8.88m long (29.2 feet), used in racing
7.  slang chase the dragon to smoke opium or heroin
 
[C13: from Old French, from Latin dracō, from Greek drakōn; related to drakos eye]
 
'dragoness
 
fem n
 
'dragonish
 
adj

dragonroot (ˈdræɡənˌruːt)
 
n
1.  a North American aroid plant, Arisaema dracontium, having a greenish spathe and a long pointed spadix
2.  the tuberous root of this plant, formerly used in medicine as an expectorant and diaphoretic

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dragon
early 13c., from O.Fr. dragon, from L. draconem (nom. draco) "serpent, dragon," from Gk. drakon (gen. drakontos) "serpent, seafish," from drak-, strong aorist stem of derkesthai "to see clearly." But perhaps the lit. sense is "the one with the (deadly) glance." The young are dragonets (14c.). Obsolete
drake "dragon" is an older borrowing of the same word. Used in the Bible to translate Heb. tannin "a great sea-monster," and tan, a desert mammal now believed to be the jackal.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Dragon definition


(1.) Heb. tannim, plural of tan. The name of some unknown creature inhabiting desert places and ruins (Job 30:29; Ps. 44:19; Isa. 13:22; 34:13; 43:20; Jer. 10:22; Micah 1:8; Mal. 1:3); probably, as translated in the Revised Version, the jackal (q.v.). (2.) Heb. tannin. Some great sea monster (Jer. 51:34). In Isa. 51:9 it may denote the crocodile. In Gen. 1:21 (Heb. plural tanninim) the Authorized Version renders "whales," and the Revised Version "sea monsters." It is rendered "serpent" in Ex. 7:9. It is used figuratively in Ps. 74:13; Ezek. 29:3. In the New Testament the word "dragon" is found only in Rev. 12:3, 4, 7, 9, 16, 17, etc., and is there used metaphorically of "Satan." (See WHALE.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Matching Quote
"Where is the literature which gives expression to Nature? He would be a poet who could impress the winds and streams into his service, to speak for him; who nailed words to their primitive senses, as farmers drive down stakes in the spring, which the frost has heaved; who derived his words as often as he used them,—transplanted them to his page with earth adhering to their roots; whose words were so true and fresh and natural that they would appear to expand like the buds at the approach of spring, though they lay half smothered between two musty leaves in a library,—aye, to bloom and bear fruit there, after their kind, annually, for the faithful reader, in sympathy with surrounding Nature. I do not know of any poetry to quote which adequately expresses this yearning for the Wild. Approached from this side, the best poetry is tame.
I do not know where to find in any literature, ancient or modern, any account which contents me of that Nature with which even I am acquainted. You will perceive that I demand something which no Augustan nor Elizabethan age, which no culture, in short, can give. Mythology comes nearer it than anything. How much more fertile a Nature, at least, has Grecian mythology its root in than English literature! Mythology is the crop which the Old World bore before its soil was exhausted, before the fancy and imagination were affected with blight; and which it still bears, wherever its pristine vigor is unabated. All other literatures endure only as the elms which overshadow our houses; but this is like the great dragon-tree of the Western Isles, as old as mankind, and, whether that does or not, will endure as long; for the decay of other literatures makes the soil in which it thrives."
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