dramatic irony

noun
irony that is inherent in speeches or a situation of a drama and is understood by the audience but not grasped by the characters in the play.

Origin:
1905–10

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World English Dictionary
dramatic irony
 
n
theatre the irony occurring when the implications of a situation, speech, etc, are understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

dramatic irony

in literature, a plot device in which the audience's or reader's knowledge of events or individuals surpasses that of the characters. The words and actions of the characters therefore take on a different meaning for the audience or reader than they have for the play's characters. This may happen when, for example, a character reacts in an inappropriate or foolish way or when a character lacks self-awareness and thus acts under false assumptions

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
This technique is exactly the opposite of dramatic irony.
Still more plot twists and dramatic irony color the spellbinding resolution.
This sets up a metastructure of dramatic irony, as we, the readers anticipate the somethingness-at-hand in contrast.
Follow with definitions of dramatic irony and foreshadowing and a discussion of their importance.
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