drivability

[drahy-vuh-bil-i-tee]
noun Automotive.
the degree of smoothness and steadiness of acceleration of an automotive vehicle: The automatic transmission has been improved to give the new model better drivability.
Also, driveability.


Origin:
1970–75; drive + -ability

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
drive (draɪv)
 
vb , drives, driving, drove, driven
1.  to push, propel, or be pushed or propelled
2.  to control and guide the movement of (a vehicle, draught animal, etc): to drive a car
3.  (tr) to compel or urge to work or act, esp excessively
4.  (tr) to goad or force into a specified attitude or state: work drove him to despair
5.  (tr) to cause (an object) to make or form (a hole, crack, etc): his blow drove a hole in the wall
6.  to move or cause to move rapidly by striking or throwing with force
7.  sport to hit (a ball) very hard and straight, as (in cricket) with the bat swinging more or less vertically
8.  golf to strike (the ball) with a driver, as in teeing off
9.  (tr)
 a.  to chase (game) from cover into more open ground
 b.  to search (an area) for game
10.  to transport or be transported in a driven vehicle
11.  (intr) to rush or dash violently, esp against an obstacle or solid object: the waves drove against the rock
12.  (tr) to carry through or transact with vigour (esp in the phrase drive a hard bargain)
13.  (tr) to force (a component) into or out of its location by means of blows or a press
14.  (tr) mining to excavate horizontally
15.  (NZ) (tr) to fell (a tree or trees) by the impact of another felled tree
16.  drive home
 a.  to cause to penetrate to the fullest extent
 b.  to make clear by special emphasis
 
n
17.  the act of driving
18.  a trip or journey in a driven vehicle
19.  a.  a road for vehicles, esp a private road leading to a house
 b.  (capital when part of a street name): Woodland Drive
20.  vigorous or urgent pressure, as in business
21.  a united effort, esp directed towards a common goal: a charity drive
22.  (Brit) beetle drive See whist drive a large gathering of persons to play cards, etc
23.  energy, ambition, or initiative
24.  psychol a motive or interest, such as sex, hunger, or ambition, that actuates an organism to attain a goal
25.  a sustained and powerful military offensive
26.  a.  the means by which force, torque, motion, or power is transmitted in a mechanism: fluid drive
 b.  (as modifier): a drive shaft
27.  sport a hard straight shot or stroke
28.  a search for and chasing of game towards waiting guns
29.  electronics the signal applied to the input of an amplifier
 
[Old English drīfan; related to Old Frisian drīva, Old Norse drīfa, Gothic dreiban, Old High German trīban]
 
'drivable
 
adj
 
'driveable
 
adj
 
driva'bility
 
n
 
drivea'bility
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Example sentences
With so many gears to choose from, it offers excellent drivability around town.
There is an adverse effect on both emissions and drivability when misfire
  condition is present.
Vehicle drivability must not be affected by any body, steering or suspension
  damage.
Learn the effects of alignment settings on drivability.
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