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dromedary

[drom-i-der-ee, druhm-] /ˈdrɒm ɪˌdɛr i, ˈdrʌm-/
noun, plural dromedaries.
1.
the single-humped camel, Camelus dromedarius, of Arabia and northern Africa.
Compare Bactrian camel.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English dromedarie, -ary (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin dromedārius (camēlus) < Greek dromad- (stem of dromás) running + Latin -ārius -ary
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for dromedaries

dromedary

/ˈdrʌmədərɪ; -drɪ; ˈdrɒm-/
noun (pl) -daries
1.
a type of Arabian camel bred for racing and riding, having a single hump and long slender legs
2.
another name for Arabian camel
Word Origin
C14: from Late Latin dromedārius (camēlus), from Greek dromas running
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dromedaries

dromedary

n.

late 13c., from Old French dromedaire, from Late Latin dromedarius "kind of camel," from Latin dromas (genitive dromados), from Greek dromas kamelos "running camel," from dromos "a race course," from PIE *drem-, from possible base *der- "to run, walk, step" (cf. Sanskrit dramati "runs, goes," Greek dromas "running," Middle High German tremen "to rock, shake, sway"). One-humped Arabian camels were bred and trained for riding. An early variant was drumbledairy (1560s).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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dromedaries in the Bible

(Isa. 60:6), an African or Arabian species of camel having only one hump, while the Bactrian camel has two. It is distinguished from the camel only as a trained saddle-horse is distinguished from a cart-horse. It is remarkable for its speed (Jer. 2:23). Camels are frequently spoken of in partriarchal times (Gen. 12:16; 24:10; 30:43; 31:17, etc.). They were used for carrying burdens (Gen. 37:25; Judg. 6:5), and for riding (Gen. 24:64). The hair of the camel falls off of itself in spring, and is woven into coarse cloths and garments (Matt. 3:4). (See CAMEL.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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