follow Dictionary.com

11 Trending Words of 2014

drove1

[drohv] /droʊv/
verb
1.
simple past tense of drive.

drove2

[drohv] /droʊv/
noun
1.
a number of oxen, sheep, or swine driven in a group; herd; flock.
2.
Usually, droves. a large crowd of human beings, especially in motion:
They came to Yankee Stadium in droves.
3.
Also called drove chisel. Masonry. a chisel, from 2 to 4 inches (5 to 10 cm) broad at the edge, for dressing stones to an approximately true surface.
verb (used with object), verb (used without object), droved, droving.
4.
to drive or deal in (cattle) as a drover; herd.
5.
Masonry. to work or smooth (stone) as with a drove.
Origin
950
before 950; Middle English; Old English drāf that which is driven, i.e., herd, flock; akin to drive
Synonyms
1. See flock1 .
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for droves
  • Riders soon arrived in droves, and the line proved to be a crucial link in the economic development of the region.
  • And audiences aren't turning out in the droves movie studio honchos were hoping to see.
  • Nowadays, even if these people have not been laid off, the great people are going to be leaving in droves.
  • And artists around the globe are signing on in droves.
  • Jellyfish are the pests of the sea, coming out in droves every summer to turn a day at the beach into a world of pain.
  • Research output is unimpressive, teaching techniques are old-fashioned and students drop out in droves.
  • But that would require more skilled foreigners to move to a country whose own engineers and doctors have fled in droves.
  • Investors are already returning in droves but it is not yet clear who is empowered to oversee the contracts.
  • And it can be rather painful so the endorphins should be out in droves.
  • If the applications are there, so the argument goes, users will follow in droves.
British Dictionary definitions for droves

drove1

/drəʊv/
verb
1.
the past tense of drive

drove2

/drəʊv/
noun
1.
a herd of livestock being driven together
2.
(often pl) a moving crowd of people
3.
a narrow irrigation channel
4.
Also called drove chisel. a chisel with a broad edge used for dressing stone
verb
5.
  1. (transitive) to drive (a group of livestock), usually for a considerable distance
  2. (intransitive) to be employed as a drover
6.
to work (a stone surface) with a drove
Word Origin
Old English drāf herd; related to Middle Low German drēfwech cattle pasture; see drive, drift
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for droves
n.

see drove.

drove

n.

Old English draf "beasts driven in a body, road along which cattle are driven," originally "act of driving," from drifan "to drive" (see drive (v.)).

Old English draf, past tense and obsolete past participle of drive (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for drove

Many English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for droves

10
11
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with droves

Nearby words for droves