drown out

drown

[droun]
verb (used without object)
1.
to die under water or other liquid of suffocation.
verb (used with object)
2.
to kill by submerging under water or other liquid.
3.
to destroy or get rid of by, or as if by, immersion: He drowned his sorrows in drink.
4.
to flood or inundate.
5.
to overwhelm so as to render inaudible, as by a louder sound (often followed by out ).
6.
to add too much water or liquid to (a drink, food, or the like).
7.
to slake (lime) by covering with water and letting stand.
Verb phrases
8.
drown in,
a.
to be overwhelmed by: The company is drowning in bad debts.
b.
to be covered with or enveloped in: The old movie star was drowning in mink.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English drounnen, Old English druncnian, perhaps by loss of c between nasals and shift of length from nn to ou

drowner, noun
half-drowned, adjective
half-drowning, adjective
undrowned, adjective


4. deluge, engulf, submerge, drench, soak.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To drown out
Collins
World English Dictionary
drown (draʊn)
 
vb (sometimes foll by out)
1.  to die or kill by immersion in liquid
2.  (tr) to destroy or get rid of as if by submerging: he drowned his sorrows in drink
3.  (tr) to drench thoroughly; inundate; flood
4.  to render (a sound) inaudible by making a loud noise
 
[C13: probably from Old English druncnian; related to Old Norse drukna to be drowned]
 
'drowner
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

drown
c.1300, perhaps from O.E. druncnian "be swallowed up by water" (originally of ships as well as living things), from base of drincan "to drink." Modern form is from northern England dialect, probably influenced by O.N. drukna "be drowned." Related: Drowned; drowning.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Easton
Bible Dictionary

Drown definition


(Ex. 15:4; Amos 8:8; Heb. 11:29). Drowning was a mode of capital punishment in use among the Syrians, and was known to the Jews in the time of our Lord. To this he alludes in Matt. 18:6.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

drown out

Overwhelm with a louder sound, as in Their cries were drowned out by the passing train. [Early 1600s]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
Cite This Source
Matching Quote
"The life in us is like the water in the river. It may rise this year higher than man has ever known it, and flood the parched uplands; even this may be the eventful year, which will drown out all our muskrats. It was not always dry land where we dwell. I see far inland the banks which the stream anciently washed, before science began to record its freshets. Every one has heard the story which has gone the rounds of New England, of a strong and beautiful bug which came out of the dry leaf of an old table of apple-tree wood, which had stood in a farmer's kitchen for sixty years, first in Connecticut, and afterward in Massachusetts,—from an egg deposited in the living tree many years earlier still, as appeared by counting the annual layers beyond it; which was heard gnawing out for several weeks, hatched perchance by the heat of an urn. Who does not feel his faith in a resurrection and immortality strengthened by hearing of this? Who knows what beautiful and winged life, whose egg has been buried for ages under many concentric layers of woodenness in the dead dry life of society, deposited at first in the alburnum of the green and living tree, which has been gradually converted into the semblance of its well-seasoned tomb,—heard perchance gnawing out now for years by the astonished family of man, as they sat round the festal board,—may unexpectedly come forth from amidst society's most trivial and handselled furniture, to enjoy its perfect summer life at last!
I do not say that John or Jonathan will realize all this; but such is the character of that morrow which mere lapse of time can never make to dawn. The light which puts out our eyes is darkness to us. Only that day dawns to which we are awake. There is more day to dawn. The sun is but a morning star."
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature