follow Dictionary.com

8 Wintry Words to Defrost Your Vocabulary

drown

[droun] /draʊn/
verb (used without object)
1.
to die under water or other liquid of suffocation.
verb (used with object)
2.
to kill by submerging under water or other liquid.
3.
to destroy or get rid of by, or as if by, immersion:
He drowned his sorrows in drink.
4.
to flood or inundate.
5.
to overwhelm so as to render inaudible, as by a louder sound (often followed by out).
6.
to add too much water or liquid to (a drink, food, or the like).
7.
to slake (lime) by covering with water and letting stand.
Verb phrases
8.
drown in,
  1. to be overwhelmed by:
    The company is drowning in bad debts.
  2. to be covered with or enveloped in:
    The old movie star was drowning in mink.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English drounnen, Old English druncnian, perhaps by loss of c between nasals and shift of length from nn to ou
Related forms
drowner, noun
half-drowned, adjective
half-drowning, adjective
undrowned, adjective
Synonyms
4. deluge, engulf, submerge, drench, soak.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for drowned
  • The calf appears to have perished when she either drowned or was suffocated in mud near the edge of a river.
  • The meeting ended early, as chanting protesters drowned out the regents' meeting, following the public-comment session.
  • The slugs end up drunk and/or drowned instead of on the lettuce.
  • But others lucky enough not to have drowned have lived for several months after the parasite removes itself.
  • It is all but drowned out by the snaps and the crackles and pops of what is by any standard a primitive recording.
  • Only if his message isn't garbled or drowned out or misunderstood will an accident be averted.
  • Most of these drowned trees were left for dead long ago.
  • Half of all species could become extinct, untold millions of people would be displaced, whole nations drowned by the sea.
  • Fishermen's modern nylon gillnets, which caught and drowned the birds, also contributed to their demise.
  • Nuanced discussion and genuine scientific exploration are drowned out by this political war.
British Dictionary definitions for drowned

drown

/draʊn/
verb
1.
to die or kill by immersion in liquid
2.
(transitive) to destroy or get rid of as if by submerging: he drowned his sorrows in drink
3.
(transitive) to drench thoroughly; inundate; flood
4.
(transitive) sometimes foll by out. to render (a sound) inaudible by making a loud noise
Derived Forms
drowner, noun
Word Origin
C13: probably from Old English druncnian; related to Old Norse drukna to be drowned
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for drowned

drown

v.

c.1300, transitive and intransitive, perhaps from an unrecorded derivative word of Old English druncnian (Middle English druncnen) "be swallowed up by water" (originally of ships as well as living things), probably from the base of drincan "to drink."

Modern form is from northern England dialect, probably influenced by Old Norse drukna "be drowned." Related: Drowned; drowning.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
drowned in the Bible

(Ex. 15:4; Amos 8:8; Heb. 11:29). Drowning was a mode of capital punishment in use among the Syrians, and was known to the Jews in the time of our Lord. To this he alludes in Matt. 18:6.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source
Idioms and Phrases with drowned
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for drown

Many English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for drowned

12
13
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with drowned

Nearby words for drowned