duke gloucester

Gloucester

[glos-ter, glaw-ster]
noun
1.
Duke of, Humphrey.
2.
a seaport in W Gloucestershire in SW England, on the Severn River.
3.
a seaport in NE Massachusetts.
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Humphrey

[huhm-free]
noun
1.
(Duke of Gloucester) 1391–1447, English soldier and statesman (youngest son of Henry IV).
2.
Doris, 1895–1958, U.S. dancer, choreographer, and teacher.
3.
Hubert H(oratio) 1911–78, U.S. politician: vice president 1965–69.
4.
a male given name: from Germanic words meaning “high” and “peace.”

Richard III

noun
1.
(Duke of Gloucester) 1452–85, king of England 1483–85.
2.
(italics) a drama (1592–93?) by Shakespeare.

Thomas of Woodstock

[tom-uhs uhv wood-stok]
noun
Duke of Gloucester, 1355–97, English prince (son of Edward III).
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
Gloucester1 (ˈɡlɒstə)
 
n
Latin name: Glevum a city in SW England, administrative centre of Gloucestershire, on the River Severn; cathedral (founded 1100). Pop: 123 205 (2001)

Gloucester2 (ˈɡlɒstə)
 
n
1.  Humphrey, Duke of. 1391--1447, English soldier and statesman; son of Henry IV. He acted as protector during Henry VI's minority (1422-- 29) and was noted for his patronage of humanists
2.  Duke of. See Richard III
3.  Duke of. See Thomas of Woodstock

Humphrey (ˈhʌmfrɪ)
 
n
1.  Duke Humphrey See Gloucester
2.  Hubert Horatio. 1911--78, US statesman; vice-president of the US under President Johnson (1965--69)

Richard III
 
n
1452--85, king of England (1483--85), notorious as the suspected murderer of his two young nephews in the Tower of London. He proved an able administrator until his brief reign was ended by his death at the hands of Henry Tudor (later Henry VII) at the battle of Bosworth Field

Thomas of Woodstock
 
n
1355--97, youngest son of Edward III, who led opposition to his nephew Richard II (1386--89); arrested in 1397, he died in prison

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Gloucester
English county, O.E. Gleawceaster, from L. Coloniae Glev (2c.), from Glevo, a Celtic name meaning "bright place" (perhaps influenced by O.E. gleaw "wise, prudent") + O.E. ceaster "Roman town."

Humphrey
masc. proper name, from O.E. Hunfrið, probably from P.Gmc. *hun "strength" + O.E. frið "peace." To dine with Duke Humphrey (17c.) meant to go without a meal, though the reason for the expression now is obscure.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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