durable

[door-uh-buhl, dyoor-]
adjective
1.
able to resist wear, decay, etc., well; lasting; enduring.
noun
2.
durables, durable goods.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French < Latin dūrābilis. See dure2, -able

durability, durableness, noun
durably, adverb
undurability, noun
undurable, adjective
undurableness, noun
undurably, adverb


1. permanent.


1. weak, transitory.
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World English Dictionary
durable (ˈdjʊərəbəl)
 
adj
long-lasting; enduring: a durable fabric
 
[C14: from Old French, from Latin dūrābilis, from dūrāre to last; see endure]
 
dura'bility
 
n
 
'durableness
 
n
 
'durably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

durable
late 14c., from O.Fr. durable, from L. durabilis "lasting, permanent," from durare "to last, harden" (see endure). Related: Durability.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Peterman clothes are pretty durable and long-lasting.
The fabric is more durable in the usual trouble spots.
Durable goods spending, inventory corrections, and government spending.
Yet they are durable and flexible enough to perform any brushing chore.
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